Category Archives: Art

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Welcome to Dan Fenelon, AntiquityNOW’s Artist-in-Residence

KachinaDan Fenelon’s art blends an infusion of pop, cartooning, modernism and tribalism along with an explosion of vibrant colors.

Influenced by cartoons from the time he was a child, his art has a whimsy and fantasy that can be embraced by children and adults alike.  The viewer becomes lost in a phantasmagorical world of dancing figures and prancing animals, floating skulls and geometric faces, curvilinear lines and mosaic-like backgrounds, ancient symbols resonating with a post-modern sensibility.  It’s a tangled web of delight and astonishment that lures you deep within this art form, and you emerge breathless from the netherworld of Dan’s imagination.

Look for upcoming announcements regarding our partnership with Dan.  And take a look at the video below to see Dan’s unique view of ancient imaginings.

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Tattoos and the Body as Canvas

celtic knot tattooToday one in five Americans have tattoos. [1] For some, tattoos are extremely personal, displaying portraits of lost family members, symbols of religion and community, or artwork.  Others will often sport designs that they believe lend a certain aura to their personality.  On the other hand, take the case of Carol Lustig. The Celtic knot tattoo on her shoulder would seem to be a reminder of her Celtic heritage. Instead, Lustig states: “I chose the design off the wall. A million people could have that same tattoo.” [2] Continue reading

From Ancient Graffiti to Modern Street Art: Our Need for Self Expression Through Time

Graffiti in Pompeii

In Pompei, graffiti on the walls often depict popular gladiators, such as these two thraeces, M. Attilius and L. Raecius Felix.

Graffiti is often the scourge of local law enforcement, but when found in an ancient town or city we view it as a valuable tool for learning about the culture, language and pastimes of the inhabitants.  Preserved ancient graffiti gives us a peak at daily life hundreds of years ago and demonstrates the basic need for human expression.  Like it or not, modern graffiti is probably here to stay for those same reasons.

The preserved Graffiti of Pompeii shows us how Latin was used in everyday language, and gives us colorful Roman insults and magical incantations. [“Graffiti: The Use of the Familiar,” Jessie L. Whitehead, Art Education , Vol. 57, No. 6 (Nov., 2004), p. 26, http://www.jstor.org/stable/27696041 ]. Continue reading